Leaders, followers, and laggards: Adoption of the US Conference of Mayors Climate Protection Agreement in California

Rui Wang*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Limited quantitative research has been devoted to voluntary climate actions at the local level. It is unclear why some cities act as leaders in the fight against climate change, some act as followers, while others remain laggards. This study tests hypotheses about local climate proactiveness to mitigate climate change. Applying a survival analysis to California cities' adoption of the US Conference of Mayors Climate Protection Agreement, I examine the association between cities' adoption of the agreement, a range of cities' characteristics, and the behavior of neighboring jurisdictions. The results suggest important roles of the overall capacity of a local jurisdiction, its staff capacity with relevant expertise, average household income level, and voter preferences. Study results also suggest the importance of local traffic conditions and the positive peer effect.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1116-1128
Number of pages13
JournalEnvironment and Planning C: Government and Policy
Volume30
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • California
  • Local climate action
  • US conference of mayors climate protection agreement

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Leaders, followers, and laggards: Adoption of the US Conference of Mayors Climate Protection Agreement in California'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this