The roles of power distance orientation and perceived insider status in the subordinates' Moqi with supervisors and sustainable knowledge-sharing

Xingshan Zheng, Lan Li*, Fangyu Zhang, Mengyuan Zhu

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although knowledge-sharing, an important facet of knowledge management, has been encouraged for the sustainable development of organizations, this kind of behavior is still not prevalent among group members. To enrich the literature and contribute to its practical usage, this research proposed a model based on the fit theory to examine the roles of perceived insider status (PIS) and power distance orientation in subordinates' Moqi with supervisors (SMS) and knowledge-sharing. Survey data from eight firms in China contained 196 samples and was analyzed by MPLUS software to justify the hypotheses. The results showed that: first, SMS predicted knowledge-sharing and perceived insider status; second, perceived insider status positively mediated the relationship between SMS and knowledge-sharing; third, power distance orientation not only positively moderated the relationship between SMS and perceived insider status, but also positively moderated the relationship between SMS and knowledge-sharing. This study enriched the literature on the antecedents of knowledge-sharing and application of SMS. Additionally, this study proposes a few suggestions to practitioners and researchers for establishing sustainable organizations.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1421
JournalSustainability (Switzerland)
Volume11
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2019
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Knowledge-sharing
  • Perceived insider status
  • Power distance orientation
  • Subordinates' Moqi with supervisors
  • Sustainable organization

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