The adoption of Firm-Hosted Online Communities: an empirical investigation into the role of service quality and social interactions

David Corkindale, Jiwat Ram*, Howard Chen

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Online communities are a powerful device for collaborative creativity and innovation. Developments in Web 2.0 technologies have given rise to such interactions through firm-hosted online communities (FHOCs)–firm-run online information services that also provide self-help to a community. We devise a model that seeks to explain the factors that encourage people to become members of a FHOC and test the model using structural equation modelling based on data collected from 511 users of a FHOC. The study finds that: (a) an understanding of Perceived Usefulness (PU) plays a mediating role between Behavioural Intention (BI) to adopt FHOC and Trust, as well as Interface design; b) Networking among users has an indirect effect on BI; and c) design of the Interface has a direct influence on BI. A managerial implication is that Networking plays a role in the way supplementary services, including blogs and discussion forums, are perceived. Theoretically, when service quality is decomposed into components such as core services and supplementary services, it also positively influences PU.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)173-195
Number of pages23
JournalEnterprise Information Systems
Volume12
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 7 Feb 2018
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Firm-hosted Online Communities
  • social interaction
  • social media
  • virtual communities

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