New Keynesian Phillips Curve and inflation dynamics in Australia

Syed Kanwar Abbas, Pasquale M. Sgro*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The New Keynesian Phillips Curve (NKPC) was developed as a response to the New Classical critique that Keynesian macroeconomics lacked micro-foundations. The NKPC provides theoretical micro-foundations that attempt to explain, inter alia, nominal rigidities and, explicitly price stickiness. This paper investigates the validity of the NKPC for Australia. In contrast to the findings for the USA and Euro area, we find that neither the output gap nor marginal cost appears to be a key driving force variable across different set of instruments and estimators (GMM and 2SLS) over the sample period from 1959 to 2009. The flattening of the NKPC along with significant presence of price stickiness is also found in the data. In particular, the reduced form coefficients and implied estimates from the structural parameters of the model support the view that inflation dynamics are forward looking while the role of lagged inflation is also statistically important only after 1980s. However, we claim that the forward looking baseline NKPC contrary to the hybrid NKPC is stable and better explains inflation dynamics for the Australian economy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2022-2033
Number of pages12
JournalEconomic Modelling
Volume28
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2011
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Australian inflation dynamics
  • New Keynesian Phillips Curve
  • Price stickiness

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