More Prosocial, More Ephemeral? The Role of Work-Related Wellbeing and Gender in Incubating Social Entrepreneurs’ Exit Intention

Jianing Dong, Xiao Wang*, Xuanwei Cao, David Higgins

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Why does social entrepreneurship tend to live so shortly? A range of studies tried to answer this question, although very few delved into the “inner layer” (psychological status) to unveil how social entrepreneurs decide to quit. Accordingly, focusing on prosocial motivation of social entrepreneurs and its impact on their work-related wellbeing and then their business exit intention, we conducted this empirical research. Furthermore, gender differences are involved based on relevant calls for in-depth investigation. With a sample of 301 respondents in China, deploying the partial least square structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM), we found prosocial motivation decreases entrepreneurs’ work-related wellbeing, which in turn, increases entrepreneurial exit intention. Furthermore, adopting the multi-group analysis (MGA) technique, we uncovered that the impact of prosocial motivation on work-related wellbeing largely is stronger for males. Our research thus contributes to the growing research and knowledge on social entrepreneurship in terms of individual personality traits and how they impact a social entrepreneur’s psychological status and thus their intention of exiting the social business. This study’s further theoretical and practical implications, as well as its limitations and thus future research directions, are discussed at the end.

Original languageEnglish
Article number3999
JournalInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Volume19
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2022

Keywords

  • entrepreneurial exit intention
  • gender
  • prosocial motivation
  • social entrepreneur
  • wellbeing

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