Humanoid versus non-humanoid robots: How mortality salience shapes preference for robot services under the COVID-19 pandemic?

Xing (Stella) Liu, Lisa C. Wan*, Xiao (Shannon) Yi

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper examines the influence of mortality salience on preference for humanoid robot service. Six studies confirm that consumers/tourists are reluctant to adopt humanoid (vs. non-humanoid) service robots and robotic services when mortality is salient. The effect is driven by the perceived threat to human identity. However, temporal distance can alleviate the mortality salience effect. Eliciting a distant-future temporal perspective can reduce consumers'/tourists' existential anxiety, and then attenuate negative reactions to humanoid service robots. This research provides an innovative standpoint on consumers' reactions to service robots under conditions of mortality salience (e.g., during the COVID-19 pandemic). It also offers insight into service robot implementation and design in the hospitality and tourism industry.

Original languageEnglish
Article number103383
JournalAnnals of Tourism Research
Volume94
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2022
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Mortality salience
  • Service robots
  • Temporal distance
  • Threat to human identity

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