Combining self-reported and sensor data to explore the relationship between fuel poverty and health well-being in UK social housing

Gengyang Tu*, Karyn Morrissey, Richard A. Sharpe, Tim Taylor

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Linking novel real-time sensor data with comprehensive individual baseline survey data, this study estimates the effect of fuel poverty on the physical and mental health of social housing tenants in the southwest of the UK. Structural equation modeling is applied to show that fuel poverty has a significant negative effect on mental health. Other socio-economic characteristics (such as age, household size) and house characteristics (e.g., energy-efficient rating, house type) are associated with fuel poverty. Fuel poverty is also related to poorer mobility. Our results suggest that special attention should be paid to tenants with disabilities and chronic diseases since they are more vulnerable to fuel poverty and health issues.

Original languageEnglish
Article number100070
JournalWellbeing, Space and Society
Volume3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2022
Externally publishedYes

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